The aims and intention of Mathematics.

At Valley End we aim to give the children a solid foundational understanding of number, the four main mathematical operations (addition, subtraction, multplication and division), fractions, shape, measures, position and direction. We also aim to develop pupils’ mathematical fluency and develop pupils’ reasoning, problem solving skills and mathematical application so that they understand and appreciate the importance of mathematics within the world that we live in.

We develop the pupils’ mathematical confidence through a build up of skills and understanding and aim for mathematics to be an enjoyable subject that teaches key skills for life.

The implementation of Mathematics and how it is taught.

In the Early Years Foundation Stage, the children are encouraged to explore and investigate number, shape, space and measures. Much of their Mathematics is embedded through work and play in other areas, when making or building things, or through role play, for example. Children develop skills in adding and subtracting, and using numbers in problem solving situations in and around the classroom. Children explore shapes and learn the vocabulary of shape. They have further opportunities to compare measurements and to use non-standard measurements in their play.

In Key Stage One the children continue to explore and investigate mathematical concepts in order to gain a deeper understanding before moving onto written jottings and calculations. They are taught to explore mathematical patterns and connections and to talk about their methods and reasoning using appropriate mathematical language and vocabulary. There is a strong emphasis on mental mathematics, problem solving and using and applying mathematics to enable children to practise their developing skills in a range of contexts.

The teaching and learning of Mathematics is engaging, creative and through the use of effective teaching strategies and resources, deepens pupil understanding. Opportunities to practise and apply mathematical skills can also be found within the school’s broad and balanced curriculum.

The impact of Mathematics and how it prepares children for their next stage of education.

EYFS

At Valley End the majority of children reach the expected standard for EYFS (as outlined below) and many children exceed this. By the end of the year, the majority of children are ready to access the Year 1 curriculum for Mathematics.

There are two Early Learning Goals within this area:

Numbers:

 count reliably with numbers from one to 20, place them in order and say which number is one more or one less than a given number.

 using quantities and objects, add and subtract two single-digit numbers and count on or back to find the answer.

 solve problems, including doubling, halving and sharing.

Shape Space and Measure:

 use everyday language to talk about size, weight, capacity, position, distance, time and money to compare quantities and objects and to solve problems.

 recognise, create and describe patterns.

 explore characteristics of everyday objects and shapes and use mathematical language to describe them.

 compare measurements and use non-standard measurements.

Year 1

At Valley End the majority of children reach the expected standard for Year 1 (as outlined below) and some children exceed this. By the end of the year, the majority of children are ready to access the Year 2 curriculum for Mathematics, can apply their understanding at an age approriate level and have developed a confidence to begin to reason and solve problems.

 

Year 1 Content

At the end of the year most children should be able to:

Number and Place Value

 count to and across 100 forwards and backwards, beginning with 0 or 1, or from any given number

 count, read, write and order numbers to 100 in numerals

 read and write numbers from 1 to 20 in words

 count in different multiples including ones, twos, fives and tens

 begin to count forwards and backwards in 10s from any number

 identify one more and one less than a given number

 identify and represent numbers using concrete objects and pictorial representations

 use the language of equal to, more than, less than, fewer, most and least

 recognise and understand odd and even numbers

Calculations

 read, write and interpret mathematical statements involving addition (+), subtraction (-) and equals (=) signs

 add and subtract one digit numbers and two digit numbers to 20 (e.g. 9+9, 18-9) including zero

 begin to find 10 more and less of a given number

 represent and learn by heart number bonds for numbers up to and including ten

 represent and use number bonds and related subtraction facts within 20

 solve simple one step problems that involve addition and subtraction

 know doubles and halves of numbers to 20

 solve simple one step problems involving simple multiplication and division using concrete objects, pictorial representations and arrays

Fractions

 understand and find ½ of a shape or quantity (Shape, Space and Measures)

 recognise and name common 2D and 3D shapes and identify their properties

 describe position, direction and movement including half turns

 know the days of the week and the months of the year

 tell the time to the hour and half past the hour

 use standard measures to measure and compare length, mass, capacity and time

 recognise all coins

 total coins up to 20p in practical situations

 organise and classify data using simple lists and tables.

Year 2

At Valley End the majority of children reach the expected standard in Year 2 (as outlined below) and a significant number of children exceed this. This prepares the children well for their next stage of education and they are ready to build on the firm mathematical foundations learnt at Valley End. By the end of Year 2, the majority of children have a solid foundational understanding of the different mathematical areas as outlined below. The majoity of chidren are able to confidently apply their understanding and skills and to solve mathematical problems and puzzles. At the end of Year 2, our children can also articulate their mathematical understanding clearly and succinctly.

Year 2 Content

At the end of the year most children should be able to:

Number and Place Value

 read and write numbers to at least 100 in numerals and words

 recognise the place value of each digit in a two-digit number (tens and ones)

 use place value and number facts to solve problems

 identify, represent and estimate numbers using different representations, including the number line

 compare and order numbers from 0 up to 100 and use <, > and = signs

 count in steps of 2, 3, 5 from 0 and count in tens from any number, forward or backward

Calculations

 solve simple on-step problems with addition and subtraction using concrete objects, pictorial representations and an increasing knowledge of mental and written methods

 recall and use addition and subtraction facts to 20 fluently and derive and use related facts up to 100

 add and subtract numbers using concrete objects, pictorial representations and mentally

 add and subtract a two-digit number and ones

 add and subtract a two-digit number and tens

 add and subtract two two-digit numbers

 add three one-digit numbers

 show that addition of two numbers can be done in any order and that subtraction of one number from another cannot

 recognise and use the inverse relationship between addition and subtraction

 recall and use multiplication and division facts for the 2, 5 and 10 multiplication tables

 understand the operation of multiplication as repeated addition and arrays

 understand the operation of division as equal grouping

 use the x, ÷ and = symbols in number sentences and when solving simple problems

Fractions

 understand and find ½ and ¼ of a shape or quantity

Shape, Space and Measure

 recognise and name regular and irregular 2D and 3D shapes and identify their properties, including right angles and symmetry

 describe position, direction and movement including rotation, quarter and half turns and clockwise and anti-clockwise turns

 choose and use appropriate standard measures to measure and compare length, mass, capacity and time

 read relevant scales to the nearest numbered unit

 tell and write the time to 5 minutes and quarter past/to the hour

 recognise and use symbols for £ and p.

 total coins up to £1 in practical situations

 recognise equivalent amounts of money

Handling Data

 construct and interpret pictograms, tables and simple graphs.

At the end of the year some children could:

Number and Place Value

 recognise the place value of each digit in a three-digit number (hundreds, tens and ones).

 compare and order numbers to 1000

 read and write numbers to at least 1000 in numerals and words

 count from 0 in multiples of 4, 8, 50 and 100

 solve number problems and practical problems using these ideas

Calculations

 add and subtract numbers mentally including a three-digit number and ones, a three-digit number and tens and a three-digit number and hundreds

 add and subtract numbers with up to three digits using efficient written methods

 estimate the answer to a calculation and use inverse operations to check answers

 solve problems, including missing number problems, using number facts, place value, and more complex addition and subtraction

 recall and use multiplication and division facts for the 3, 4 and 8 multiplication tables

 begin to multiply a 2 digit number by a 1 digit number using efficient written methods

 solve problems, including missing number problems, involving multiplication and division

Fractions

 understand and find ¾ and 1/3 of a shape or quantity

 begin to understand equivalent fractions

Shape, Space and Measure

 recognise right angles as a quarter turn

 begin to understand equivalent standard units of measure

 add and subtract amounts of money and give change in £ and p.

Handling Data

 solve problems using information presented in pictograms, bar charts and tables.